About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
CNNW 30
MSNBCW 24
CSPAN 20
CSPAN2 14
CNBC 10
FBC 8
KNTV (NBC) 7
KGO (ABC) 4
KTVU (FOX) 4
KPIX (CBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
KQED (PBS) 2
KBCW (CW) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 173
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 173 (some duplicates have been removed)
it is important to realize that it is possible to make investments in our economy today, create jobs, repeal the sequester, and still reduce our deficit in a responsible and laled way. -- and balanced way. in closing i urge my colleagues not to be scared by the rhetoric that sometimes we hear. instead, i urge my colleagues to support one of the multiple budget proposals that reduce our deficit responsibly while creating jobs today and protecting the important programs like medicaid and medicare for generations to come. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank the gentlelady for being with me on the floor today. i'll say that we sometimes have some controversy in the rules committee, mr. speaker. there is a lot of responsibility that lies in the rules committee. with 435 folks here in this chamber. we all would like to have our say. we'd all like to have our say probably more than once. and the rules committee's tasked wi
we all want to go. wwe want to have a growing economy, weal we want to deal with our deficit. these are challenging, complex goals. we can get there. even the action of this body last night in passing the fyn.2013 appropriations bill shows we can cooperate together and with the thousands get there. it is my hope that that will inspire us going forward. the question is this: we all agree that what has been done thus far in the area of deficit reduction equates to about $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction that has been done by the last congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls abo
correction? with the rising economy and profits this rally still has legs. also in year three of obama care premiums and insurance costs are rising sky-high. so are taxes. and small business costs are reducing profits by as much as 65% according to one small business owner we will talk to tonight. and the virtues of a free market capitalism that we talk about every night on this show are now forbidden fruit at stanford university. a popular long running pro capitalist course at that school has now been cancelled. what is up with that? "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up, a major vote in the cyprus parliament helping to get that country closer to a teal with the european union. michelle caruso-cabrera joins us from cyprus again this evening with the very latest. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: larry, lawmakers here in cyprus taking a huge step tonight to prevent the financial collapse of their country. they pass ad law that will allow for the restructuring of their banks. this essentially means their sickest and largest banks will be down sized and made more healthy. this
to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close those special interest tax loopholes that riddle our tax code, republicans said no. democrats proposed to offset unwise republican cuts to medical research like alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes research at n.i.h., republicans said no. democrats tried to cut the special interest spending in the tax code to offset republican cuts to students who rely on pell grants but republicans said no. mr. van hollen: i yield the gentleman another minute and a half. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. ms. castor: the democrats in the budget committee proposed to strengthen medicare and replace the republican plan to turn medicare into a voucher program. all it does is simply shift the cost tour families and older neighbors. mr. speaker, this republican budget is not consistent with american values. it is not fiscally responsible. it is a
bernanke will keep printing to bail out barack obama's weak economy. and print as many yen as it takes to bail out japan. the markets truly love it. europe is the odd man out. they've given ultimatum to cyprus, no bailout if you can't get it together by next tuesday. here is something else to get you fired up. cyprus wants to nationallize y payshun money. "varney & company" is about to begin. [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futureses move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webinars. and trade with papermoney to test-drive the market. ♪ all on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. all on thinkorswim. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >> thursday, march 21st. m headline today, ben bernanke
to share with you some views of the economy from our 54 respo respondents. firming housing prices are a game changer. there is something much more self-feeding about recovery this year. could be a turning point. the objepposite from john rober. we believe a recession/economic slowdown is a possibility in the latter half of 2014 or early in 2015. some of the excesses that could cause a recession are beginning to build in the economy. another piece of data, the biggest problems facing our economy, taxes/regulation, 29%. i would say that's a victory given that europe is not in there for fear of recession is not in there. too much deficit reduction, 16%. slow job growth, 12%. too little deficit reduction, 10%. guys, these are more normal problems, i would say, than we've had in the past. the european financial crisis, u.s. financial crisis. sue, i would take a victory, yes, there are problems out there. >> i totally agree with you. it's the first time in a long time we haven't seen europe on a list like that. >> thank you, steve. >> absolutely. thanks, steve. >> sure. >> the markets h
safe financial move it could hurt young adults and economy as a whole. brenda buttner, anchor of "bulls and bears." i guess it's a story here is that young people are avoiding debt and not getting sort of themselves mixed up in some of these predatory practices that young people have been the target in the past. so had a part of the story is good, right? >> absolutely. during the great recession everybody stopped using their credit cards but particularly those under 35. especially undergraduates as you brought up. in a sense that is good, whenever you hear from a personal financial expert, get some extra money, pay off your credit card debt, but having no credit and misusing credit are two different things and could have potentially difficult implications for our economy and for these young adults. >> rick: i remember my mother telling me, go and get one credit card, buy something you need but get your books and put it on the card and then pay it off in full. that is the way to start establishing a good credit? >> who is your mom. eileen -- that is good advice to your son. that is exact
this. gallup, fox news, rasmussen, after the economy, the number two concern to the people is the debt. i think there is a growing sense that government spending and government debt at these levels, it does act as a huge drag on the economy. connell: what we have been saying here, unless the interest rates start to go up, you can pull people and they can say whatever they want. their behavior will not change unless you see a spike in interest rates. >> it will be hard to get a spike in interest rates with the fed flooding the system with liquidity. the whole world is on painkillers right now. we have become addicted to liquidity, easy solutions and until the fed start to bring it in and interest rates go up, i do not see a change. dagen: do the people who are still buying taxable debt, you start to see money flowing back into u.s. stock. you see billions every week into world stock. >> i think we are somewhere close to the end of a bond bubble. for the third time in 60 years, we are looking at ten year treasury rates below inflation. that is, obviously, not a way to build over time. we
food assistance to kids in this country and funding for r&d will drive our economy, but we can't appropriate a sum of money to fix the real cost of iraq. can't pay back the lives of 4,486 american men and women who have died there or the roughly 2,000 broken soldiers who came home and took their own lives. the wounded, physically and mentally, the soldiers who didn't know how not to be a soldier, the families living with a hole in their hearts and the families living with someone they no longer recognize. 10 years leaving their families, living in hell, coming home to unemployment and the homelessness, to a country that's forgotten that it's at war at all, to a country that seems to think a yellow ribbon magnet on their bumper is the only kind of support that oir troops need and the cost in iraq, untold deaths. let me rephrase that. unknown deaths. we can only guess at the destruction that we have left in our wake. 115,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in
times the size of its economy without having some kind of bail structure in a solution, it becomes very difficult. and i think that understanding is quite clear among investors. so from a longer term perspective, i think there's a positive element here which is a more substantial bailin in this solution. >> valentin, what kind of exposure do you have in europe at this point and what changes have you made in regard to how the cypriot levy is handled? >> it is creating a bit of uncertainty. clearly, it comes from lingering uncertainty over the political situation in italy. so all in all, it makes the bit more cautious on europe. not so much on our overall willingness to take risks. we're still overweight global real estate, but we have still put down our exposure in europe, so we are now under weight european equities. we are cautious on peripheral bull markets and european fixed income space. so that is the main changes. still on the regional allocation that we have, but not so much altering our overall willingness to look for risk. i think in general, the broadening of the global cycle
, it adopts the european style austerity approach that we've seen slow down economies in many parts of europe. we should instead be focusing on job growth and putting people back to work rather than a budget like this budget which will result in 750,000 fewer americans working by the end of this year. that's according to the independent nonpartisan congressional budget office. and it will result in more than two million fewer people working next year. it also fails the test of taking a balanced approach. because it is founded on the failed idea that combiffing another round of tax cuts to people at the very high end of the income scale will somehow trickle down and lift up all the other votes. but we know that hasn't worked and yet it is pursued once again such that everybody in e republican is asked to folks at the pt top. we offered, we democrats offered an amendment in the budget committee to say don't increase taxes on middle class americans and all the republican colleagues voted no. it it is based on the idea that we should dramatically cut investments that are important to help our eco
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
, the appropriate spending reduction so we can try to get this economy back on track. excitingt is an activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of representatives today. this is a budget by paul ryan that will allow us to get to balance. that means the government will stop sending more money than it takes in by the end of the decade, which is really exciting. what that allows us to do is to get the economy rolling, jobs being created and provide more certainty so young people coming out of college know there is going to be a job in their field. those in the workforce will know they will be needed. those in retirement, social security and medicare and those will be strengthened and security. an exciting time. guest: -- the: when it comes to continued resolution which funds the government through september, did it include sequester cuts that took effect earlier this month? spending atcludes the sequester level. there is flex ability for the military, department of defense and a few other areas that allow money to be moved to areas of
and howard ward. >> economy is getting better, capital chase returns and stocks continue to trend higher although there's profit taking here and there. >> okay. we'll take that to the bank. the key question about europe. it's all about credit quality. >> who do we have to worry about? >> spanish, italian and greece. >> you're very worried. >> people have to start doing their work. europe never did the work of fixing bank solvency in the first place. >> gentlemen, thank you for being here. >> happy monday. >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to the last week of the first quarter. good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with melissa lee and jim kraker. futures reflecting the relief of the cyprus deal. a similar picture in europe where the italian tenure is now below where it was before those italian elections and a mixed picture in asia this morning. the nikkei up about 1.5%. the road map begin with the eurozone that did not collapse over the weekend so natura
agenda. he got health care passed and fixed the economy. he has the economy on the right track. the gun issue was not a big deal with him in the beginning. gale marriage was not a big issue, but they have become centerpieces, that's the period he's in at this point. republicans are cooperating to the degree that they appeared to be disorganized enough that he appears to be right on track. >> you know, on that point, in terms of the economy, victoria, the president talking about the budget last week, he said something that the gop just jumped all over. the president said, and i'm quoting him, we don't have an immediate crisis in terms of debt, and the republicans and the right wing went bananas. but then mr. boehner and ryan, of course, agree with him. watch this. >> we do not have an immediate debt crisis, but we all know that we have one looming. >> we do not have a debt crisis right now, but we see it coming. we know it's irrefeetably happeningivities they say the president shouldn't have said it, now you have boehner and ryan saying it, about you if both say we don't have an immediat
to us that -- quote -- "the need to transform the world's energy economy while addressing global climate change is not only a religious and moral imperative, it is a strategy for security and survival. the united states conference of catholic bishops says that -- and i quote -- "at its core, global climate change is not about economic theory or political platforms, nor about partisan advantage or interest group pressures. it is about the future of god's creation and one human family." the bishops asked congress to consider seven principles in shaping responsible climate change policies. one, addressing global climate change means protecting the common good. two, climate change will hit the most vulnerable communities the hardest. three, we must seek solutions that enhance rather than diminish the economic standing of the poor. four, new resources must be made available to poor communities to adapt to the effects of a changing climate. five, we must protect vulnerable people from the negative human health effects of climate change. six, local affected communities should have a voi
stuart: the highlight reel. all about cyprus. cyprus, they'll out approved. >> the economy is likely to get worse. >> continuation of stealing what has already been stolen. they will not be happy. >> they are devastated. that is not what cyprus is or ever was. >> europe does not have the mechanisms in place that the united states has to manage a currency or a banking system. >> watch the euro. that affects all of us. stuart: italian banks have been halted in trading. charles: yes. stuart: why? charles: they are worried. these stocks are plummeting. stuart: the dutch finance minister said the cyprus situation is a good template for other european countries. they have reached into private bank accounts, taken the money out and used it to finance the bailout. that is what everybody wanted to avoid and now the dow is down 43 points. >> that italian banks are frozen because now the fear is they will have their money taken out. stuart: the dutch minister is now staying this could prompt a euro zone bank restructuring. that is why the dow is now down 46 points. you have a 80-point
and the austerity he is putting in place has caused the economy to be really slow. >> a lot of tax increases over there in europe. we look at this austerity bit. i want to talk about this for a second. >> i want to get back to the budget then. >> talk about what is happening in washington. you know, economics discussed on tv or on the internet or on twitter, it's so depressing, because people really don't know what they are talking about and they just sort of boil it down and there is this belief through the years, that tax cuts are not a tool used. of course, tax cuts are a tool used and tax increases something that traditional are against in bad times. we hear about austerity across great britain and we never hear about the tax increases. when you talk about the fact they cut and slash spending at the same time they hike taxes, it really was a formula made to fail. >> spending cuts and tax increases both take money out of the economy and slow the economy and, yes, they create this idea of austerity. but, look. it's a balancing problem. on the one hand you need to deal with it budgets and defici
at home, what do we do about our economy so we don't become a cyprus isn't senate passed its first real bottoming proposal in more than four years. but many americans are worried that lawmakers are kicking the can down the road. the majority say they are slightly less nervous about the economy than they were in 2010. an overwhelming number of us think the number-1 challenge to our economy is the continuing, mounting debt. we have a former media spokesperson for george w. bush and a democratic political consultant to hillary clinton for president. mersaides and richard, welcome to both of you. americans are sick of this. look at the debt clock this. thing keeps whizzing up. the debt is mounting. every sunday, i show this. it has gone up another trillions, it seems, theres and multi-millions. mercedes, how do we stop that in its tracks and make it go the other way? >> we can't stop it when you have the budget plan that senator murray has pushed through. 50 of all, because it has such little support from american voters. for example, we saw a poll saying that only 28% of likely voters sup
records, taking, and larryeating bails glazer from the economy summit. and bruce is in pennsylvania where the snow has begun. reporter: well, neil, that heavy snow from this morning has turn into light snow this afternoon and now more of a freezing rain. literally minutes ago the sun made an appears and that is rare. no blizzard here but another significant snowfall. two or throw inches around most of the region, now a slushy mess. it began this morning. we expect it will not wrap up until late tonight. this is actually the 11th day in the month of march with some kind of trace amount of snow or more. none of them any big deal but all of them irritating. last month, one day with a trace of snow. temperatures much colder this march. the average high 15 degrees colder this march than last march, and just two days in the entire month of march that the national weather service would regard as clear, day where the sun was actually out. a fair number of fender benders this morning, but overall more of a slushy mess than a real danger. the temperatures are expected to get down near freezing, so
's going in the wrong direction now. sandra: saying more federal spending will help the economy, not something that all of us believe is true to be the case. >> no, but i got to go back a little bit there. it's absolutely true that he did miscalculate because neither the president nor myself nor many rational people -- sandra: would he admit that? >> yeah, i think he might, i don't know. nobody thought the house republicans were crazy enough to go through this ridiculous -- sandra: were they crazy? the sun came up. we get through the airport lines -- >> let me address that -- you guys had a ball on this, well, the sun came up, nothing changed. you may live to regret that because, you know, these problems are coming, and, in fact, today, michele bachmann, of all people, was decrying the sequester. why? because an airport in her district lost its tower and has been affected. the cuts are coming. in fact, the only thing that's fore stalled it a bit is the deal made on the continuing resolution. sandra: dan, i argue, however, immediately following, we saw the government, the adminis
a gloomy new report on the state of retirement savings. >> the recent headlines about the economy as we've talked about have been pretty good but the lingering effect of the great recession is that a lot of americans have had to dip into their savings to get by. and of course that could be a problem in the years to come for many americans. they're supposed to be the golden years. but a new report says retirement like this is way out of reach for most americans who just aren't socking away enough. even with markets near record highs, the confidence workers have in their retirement is low. the employee benefit research institute found that 49% of americans aren't sure they'll be able to retire comfortably and they're not doing much about it. >> it's one of the scariest things is that it is not just that people don't have a lot of retirement savings. it's they don't know what they need. they don't know what they don't have. so, you know, what you would like to see is more people really sitting down with an adviser doing some hard math. instead, people seem to be crossing their fingers and
for a retirement crisis even as the stock market sits near highs and the economy shows improvement. host: so we're getting your take on this. your retirement andization. tell us if you are and why and if you are not, why not? it's a story in the "usa today" as well this morning confidence in retirement continues to flail about this report, because americans have to cope with many immediate financial concerns retirement is taking a backseat. only 2% of workers and a% of retirees say retirement is their most pressing issues. among other worries -- host: at least many americans have a more realistic perspective about retirement says the senior vice president of retirement and investor services at the principle financial group. host: in arkansas, a democrat, are you saving? caller: yes, i save every penny i can get my hands on. host: 401-k or how are you saving? caller: c.d.'s and bank accounts that are ensured. host: why not put it in the market? caller: i can't afford to lose it. i've seen too many people lose their behinds and with what little money i've saved all my life, i can't afford to lose
if constant budget deficits are going to ruin the economy they're taking an awful long time about doing so. the real fact about the budget is that the deficit has to be sustainable. but basically the government is a lot more like a company than it is like a household. and a company has debt as part of its permanent capital structure and it can have that debt forever. if the company keeps grog, it can take on more debt. similarly if we run a budget deficit, so long as it is small enough relative to the amount of economy is growing over the long-term that can be sustainable. we have to shrink the budget deficit over time, but not all the way to zero. the democrats are closer to correct on this point where the republicans have been attacking them because their budget doesn't balance over ten years. the budget shouldn't balance over ten years. >> i think you hit a key point. it's all about growth. you can grow your way out of deficits. we saw it during the clinton administration. it's also about looking at how far we've come. if you actually look at what we've already done in terms of getting
demand. moreover because of stronger growth in each economy. it has the beneficial spillovers to trading partners. there will be a test later. thank you. ashley: there are always two sides of the story. central banks have been doing it all around the world. tracy: i know. peter barnes will bring you the q&a session of bernanke's comments when they have been live. ashley: let's check these markets. nicole petallides at the nyse. you are also looking at some big tech names. nicole: i am keeping an eye on blackberry and yahoo!. down almost 3%. goldman sachs downgraded. it is not really up to par and not really doing that well. they are not seeing the sales that they had hoped. let's take a look at yahoo!. it is up one half of 1%. 23.25 a share. back to you. ashley: barely up, but it is up. thank you. tracy: boeing announcing its plan to conduct a 787 and flight today. the troubled dreamliner has been grounded since early january. we heard last week they would do a little test flight. ashley: hopefully no smoke. with the securities and exchange commission approving nasdaq's plan to pay out t
to do it this way, as for 2014, i thi it depends on the circumstances in the economy. if there is more obama fatigue. lou: can i say, watching the republican party with all prevail -- tre veil, i think that everyone better give up on idea of doing anything with the democrats and letting the economy doing the intellectual heavy lifting for the republican party, they better get ready to go. because, this is not going to be a default election, just as 2012 was. i have to -- i hate to do it, but we have to right there. anyway, thank yo thank you very, that is it for us, we hope you will be us tomorrow, congressman frank wolf of join us. on what is going on in the obama justice department, from new york. york. >> you know every liberal's dream that government seizing your money out right, there is nothing you can do about it. now no cyprus they could find out the hard way, this tiny island nation sent a tsunami shockwave to the rest of the world, keeping the banks closed until they find a more palatable way to. welcome i am neil cavuto, you got 10 grand in a bank account. how about waking
in a trillion dollars. you would still be left with a deficit and you would wreck the economy. martha: interesting lesson. stuart, thanks very much. we'll be watching it throughout the day as i know you will. let's look at bigger picture of europe's debt crisis. five countries needed bailouts from the european central bank and imf. greece, spain, ireland, portugal as stuart mentioned. germany the fifth biggest. great britain at number eight. france with the 9th largest. italy at number ten. they all shrunk in the last quarter of last year. europe is basically contracting. the eurozone is losing huge numbers of jobs. a record 19 million people are unemployed. it is a tough picture and one we need to watch closely here at home. bill: sure do. no telling when that thing will get straightened out. >>> more rough water for carnival cruise lines. another disabled ship of vacationers, limping back to port. legend arriving yesterday. a leading senator calling for a passenger bill of rights. what would be in that bill? peter doocy live in washington. what would this bill of rights do, peter? >
. and stay the course. that's the message from the fed chairman ben bernanke today. he says our economy is improving but it still needs help. so the fed will keep interest rates at record low levels and will keep buying $85 billion in bonds each month. stocks like that, the dow up 56 points. briefly hitting a new record. the nasdaq up 25. the s&p up 10. of course, investors the world over are still watching the tiny island nation of cyprus as it nears possible bankruptcy. banks there are closed for the rest of the week now. and lawmakers are working on a plan b after parliament rejected a proposal to tax people's savings accounts. the fox business network peter barnes is live in the newsroom in washington. how concerned is the fed about cyprus? >> well, shep, he said the feted is paying attention to it, monitoring cyprus carefully. he said that so far its problems don't appear to be spreading to the u.s. or other countries. and that's the big concern here that this could become a contagion and trigger another financial crisis. but, bernanke suggested cyprus is unique, that its banking s
at the department of labor as he is there, he will have a much broader effect on the economy and the way that people work and are employed. >> megyn: as we speak, we are just getting this breaking news in that senator vittert-- senator vitter is coming out and saying he'll block the perez nomination and saying he's committed to doing that and that he was directly involved in the the controversial new black panther voter intimidation case and his record should be met with great suspicion by those in the senate saying in particular his home state of louisiana needs to have cause for concern about the nomination. already begins, chris, thank you. >> yes, ma'am. >> megyn: and again, as we mentioned, mr. perez has been dogged by some controversy throughout his time at the doj, including the testimony he just mentioned to a civil rights commission about his handling of the new black panthers case. again, the inspector general finding that he did mislead when it came to that issue although concluding it was not intentional. that testimony and the background on the controversy are on foxnews.com right now,
. >>> so just where is the economy headed? according to federal reserve chief ben bernanke the economy is improving. however, interest rates will stay low now until unemployment falls below 6.5%. >>> more news from nike after the bell investors will look at nike's future orders. china trends. and gross margins for a read on consumer demand in china and here at home. >>> expectations are climbing for home sales. >>> cash-strapped cyprus banks are still closed and late night meetings broke up with no new plan b to fund the island's much need bailout. the european central bank gave cyprus until monday to work out a deal or be cut off from emergency funding. >>> closer to home, cvs is weighing in on its controversial policy to require employees to report their weight and body fat or face a health insurance premium increase. the company insists all data collected during health screenings is private. >>> fans of starbucks will be happy to know beginning in may they can also rack up rewards points with packaged coffee purchases at grocery and drugstores. >>> meanwhile, walmart is expanding it
increases, even some stimulus money to try to get the economy going. but it's significant that they're fighting at a lower level of intensity and turmoil. notice that the congress left for easter break without a crisis over a government shutdown. there was no crisis over potential debt limit, and government default earlier this year. could come back this summer but so long as it lasts, that's calming for the markets and good for the economy, and it may, lester, leave some space still for a compromise in which democrats would agree to changes in cuts in medicare and social security, and republicans would come up with a little bit more tax revenue, lester. >> all right, john harwood tonight, thank you. >>> president obama wrapped up his four-day visit to the middle east today, after helping israel and turkey end a three-year diplomatic dispute. that, in turn, will help the region deal with the civil war in syria. before he left today, the president turned his attention to the past, visiting jordan's ancient city of petra, one of the world's most celebrated archaeological sites. with t
and the eurozone andng period of uncertainty insecurity surrounding the cyprus economy has in then. avertede we have iterally the possibility of bankruptcy and assure the prospects for generations to come. >> was it really aconite for cyprus? pension and insurance funds face major losses in the big banks. that will hurt ordinary people. lines of credit to small businesses could freeze. austerity will begin to eat into jobs, growth, and salaries. without a deal, cyprus faced immediate ruling. which is, the pain will still come, just perhaps more slowly. will nowd nation receive a $13 billion package of rescue loans, not enough, some predict, to avoid trouble down the road. in europe isry going to decide the pain of being inside the bureau is not risk losingn you 40% of deposits. >> without an agreement, cyprus would have become the first country to leave the euro. that has been averted. aanswered questions include or cost, to whom, and for how long? economice to an historian at the university of cyprus. he said the deal marks the beginning of a long and painful process of reform. >> disaster has
back the economy and the g.o.p. believes mr. obama is creating a nation at war with itself. the affluent vs. the nonaffluent. over the weekend senator ted cruze of texas, a conservative, delivered a very emotional speech at cpac. >> my father came from cuba. he had been in prison. he had been tortured in cuba. and he came to texas with nothing, with 100 in his underwear. didn't speak a word of english. washed dishes making 50 cents an hour. in someone had came up to that 18-year-old kid avenue as he was washing dishes and suggested to him that 55 years hence his son would be sworn into office as a united states senator representing the great state of texas. [ applause ] that would have been unimaginable. >> now mr. cruze says his dad made it on his own without government assistance. he worked hard and provide for his family and now his son has achieved the american dream. that's the way this country is supposed to work. but president obama himself has a very compelling story to tell. his father abandoned him. he was raised primarily by his maternal grandparents in hawaii. h
shall face a total collapse of the banking system and of the whole economy. >> reporter: such talk may well be brinksmanship. it's not. these people and many more across europe would be forever changed by the events of the past three days. >> woodruff: for a closer look at the crisis in cyprus and why it's captured the attention of europe and the u.s., we turn to jacob kirkegaard, a senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. welcome to the program. >> my pleasure. woodruff: why does tiny cyprus, a population just over one million, have europe, the markets, the government so rattled? >> i think there's two main reasons. first of all that europe is still kind of on the edge. it doesn't take much to shatter the sort of recent lull of confidence that you have had in europe in the last couple of months. unfortunately, i think cyprus is one such thing. and the other element is that what happens in cyprus and with respect to the cyprusian banks have a large precedent-setting effect for how europe going forward is going to deal with banking crises in other european co
and the economy, support for proxies'. if you had the opportunity to sit quietly with the supreme leader of iran and talk to him, talk him out of whatever he appears to be intending to do, what would you say to him about u.s. intentions at u.s. cooperation with our partners in the region? >> i would send dennis rodman over there. [laughter] the truth is the first thing i would do i would ask why they are doing what they're doing and i would like to hear it from him personally. because we know of course what his surrogates and proxy's are doing. i would like to know from him they close by the way, you know in that region that the three countries that have always been country, iran, turkey, egypt, they are the cornerstone of that region. it does not mean that we want to be like them or anyone want to be like them, but we have to account for the fact that those three countries are the historic cornerstones or and points of that region. the first thing i would like to is what is a they believe the future holds for the region and why are they apparently, it seems to me, on a path to try to dredge up
in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he putting things off? well, i guess if i had their budget and looked at it compared to our budget, that's what i'd want to do. but that's not fair and that's not right. so i just came to the floor to join my colleague from washington in pleading with our colleagues, let's have a real debate on the budget. the lines are squarely -- are sharply drawn. our budget and your budget contrast. let the american people hear the debate and decide who they like. we're pretty confident they'd like ours better. you no longer have the talking point, we don't have a budget. so instead you're preventing us from talking about our budget. it is not fair, not right, and doesn't really help the process. so i would hope that i know there are some members
economy and creates good jobs that american people need to support their families. we must balance our budget for our students. those who are currently in our universities and community colleges should feel confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, m
of the total economy were over 20%. in this republican fantasy land budgets are balanced with revenues at 19% of the economy, yet meeting the needs of 78 million more seniors and a infrastructure deficit that is growing as america is falling apart. clearly this is not remotely possible if we are going to enjoy anything like our current quality of life. there is a real world intersection of budget saving opportunities with potential areas of agreement. health care reform is one. but not just by shifting the burden to seniors and disabled as the republicans propose in their fantasy budget. my home state of oregon is the middle of an exciting demonstration of how to squeeze out the waste we all know is there and realign incentives. instead of the empty ritual of pretending to repeal obamacare, let's work together to accelerate reform for all americans. if the oregon experiment works, and frankly many of these efeshencies by the way are already achieved in other parts of the country and with some private health systems, we could save more than $1.2 trillion that is the flawed sequester is suppos
. if the economy hobbles along and don't get me wrong, the markets are roaring, we've had a few days where it has slowed just a bit. but the average american, the pedestrian middle class family how well are they doing? how confident are they? and if the economy slows for them, the prospects for immigration reform, i don't believe are nearly as high, if you don't get what mark has been saying now for over two weeks. the sequencing done right on this cut spending cuts and tax reform. things sound great and they're moving along now. but joe, as we talked about earlier, you're going to have reticent democrats. and even key congressional races who are going to slow down a bit and saying, look, i want immigration and guns dealt with, what are we doing about the economy and the budget, the debt, and tax reform? >> and this is, richard haas, you can only push people so far, i mean, not the republicans' best friend. this weekend said democrats you're about to lose me. i pay 40% federal, 15%. well, i hear we have it cued up. let's go. this is bill maher this weekend. >> -- actually do pay the freight in th
is your final four. the economy versus policy and fundamentals versus market. the policy in washington, d.c. and the economy which you could argue is getting better. >> it will be an amazing face-off. you mentioned harvard and cyprus. it has been a sweet 16 weeks for the stock market. that is a record unbeaten since 1989. cyprus this week halted that rally. we are seeing better job growth here. take a look. that's a cluster that is taking in, it will cost us 750,000 jobs this year. connell: the big interrupter, we have another good day today for the stock market. do you think washington can still upset at? >> i do. as we look at some of the other brackets, we are getting into the pre-announcement season for earnings. we have a number of positive valuations. when you look at just 1% earnings growth and those numbers being revised lower, hard to see the market. connell: you are worried, specifically about what type of a pullback. make your case. >> i think we are very close to that pullback. i think what we will see is it is maybe not the drivers that we are used to or we heard about over t
newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the la
a two day meeting on the economy this afternoon. then fed chairman ben bernanke will hold a news conference. we will have live coverage of his remarks to reporters at 2:30 eastern on c-span3. here's some of what we're covering this morning. the house is expected to finish work on the republican budget of the 2014 budget. live coverage of 10:00 eastern on c-span. on c-span2, the senate is working on a measure to fund the federal government for the rest of the fiscal year. testifying about the ongoing two year civil war in syria. that live hearing starts at 9:45 eastern. this week marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the iraq war. in 45 minutes we will talk with california representative barbara lee, who opposed u.s. military action in iraq. and a congressman who served as a u.s. air force reserve chaplin, we will get his perspective on the war and veterans' issues. will, a virginia senator join us as part of our spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcom
economy. with me is david callahan from a liberal think tank. let's take the rate for billionaires. and then they want 45% for millionaires, right? number one, i don't quite understand. i guess billionaires and millionaires would have to hand over their personal portfolio information to the irs? that would have to happen, right? >> the idea here, bill, is that donald trump and his dermatologists shouldn't be paying the same tax rate. right now, after 39 percent, everybody who makes more than $400,000 a year pays the same rate. so, it doesn't make sense that a dermatologist making $425,000 a year pays the same rate. >> bill: why doesn't that make sense? you always have a top rate on anything, okay? so you want a progressive rate up to infinity, i guess. that would require the federal government to go into my house and almost do a cool could you legs of what i'm worth to put a onerous taxation on me. do you believe it's right for any of government to impossession a 39%, 45% on anybody. >> that's what lobled degeneres. >> i want to know what you believe. >> 1981 the tax rate. >> back
deal with the economy. the senate plan calls for $46.5 trillion in spending, nearly $5 trillion more than the house plan and more revenue an additional $1 billion more than the house plan. the biggest difference would be the impact on the nation's ballooning deficit. the senate plan is projected to cut spending by $975 billion over the next ten year. in the same time the house plan would cut a lot more. $6 trillion nearly. and if all this is not enough number crunching for you president obama is expected to release his budget plan in early april. of course, we will take a look and report. >>> europe holding its collective breath time as the nation of cypress teethers on bankruptcy. a lot of wealthy europeans particularly russians park their money in cyprus bank. if the financial system fails. they will be asked to foot the bill for the bailout of the bank. we started seeing how they might pay with talk of a 20% tax on bank deposits. a chance the banks to collapse by tuesday there. >> reporter: harris that is absolutely right. unless there is a bailout deal and reportedly that could b
similar philosophy and economic programs created a thriving state economy where 1.4 million new net jobs were added during his time in office. there are other fundamentally important issues where the two men match. stemming the rise of health care, school choice, and as i'm sure we'll hear this morning, addressing the issues involving immigration that affecting -- that affect all of us. issues that continue to resonate as important topics in the our lives, ones in which governor bush has demonstrated much-needed leadership today. it is for these and many other reasons that jeb bush stands a as the only republican governor in the history of the state of florida to be reelected to office. he hails from a family that has gone out of their way to extend warmth and support to mrs. reagan, and all of us at the reagan library over the years. let us extend that warmth to him. ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming governor jeb bush. [applause] >> very kind. really honored to be here. [applause] whoo, thank you. thank you all so much. ambassador, great seeing you. thank you so much. it
it again. cyprus is only the third smallest economy in the euro zone. if it has to devalue its currency, then do we have a domino fall and a fall in other places, spain, italy, and then do we see the whole thing going over with greece and the rest? >> and impacts us, and people may begin to take some of their money out of stocks here at home. >> what happens, people flee, basically, to quality. the dollar go up and treasuries being bought and see people getting out of risky things such as stocks. >> harris: you're the silver lining person on fox report weekend. you always find it for us and say later on in the week no matter what happens, if we feel a hiccup, if we don't, because of this week and cyprus and european problems over there, we have some good news coming? >> plenty to move the markets this week, and we have news on housing, both on prices and pending home sales and prices across the country and he we also have consumer confidence which has been quite high. so the housing rebound is something that's been pushing the bulls and they have been very resilient. we've seen them run
economies. this is what they've been looking forward to. >> reporter: double slide and its scene nick views will be open to cars and sight seers and on lookers. >> we're excited about that. >> reporter: is this going to bring you back? >> definitely. >>> in honor of the new double slide bypass they've created a new beer, tunnel vision ale. >>> another major change, toll takers disappear this wednesday on the golden gate bridge. cost co, safe way or walgreens is where you can purchase your cards. you can drive through and wait for a bill to arrive in your mail. do not stop at the toll plaza. >>> another soldier from the bay area has been killed in afghanistan. james griffin died last thursday. he was from hayward, went to mt. event event event deny. this was his fifth overseas deployment. he's survived by his wife, parents and sister. >>> a man accused of killing at quant co says he's not the type to do this type of thing. marine core investigators say he killed lance corp practical and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 173 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)